Body-Mind approach to infertility

Body-Mind approach to infertility

By James Schwartz Can Our Thoughts And Feelings Create Infertility? Nearly seven million women in the U.S. have been diagnosed with unexplained infertility. That means that according to Western Medicine there is no physiological reason why these women can’t conceive.  The question then becomes: if the physical body is not the cause, could it be that the missing factor might be somewhere in the mental and emotional realms? In our society it is commonly acknowledged that psychosomatic disharmonies could be related to physical malfunctions in the body.  For example, someone under tremendous stress might experience symptoms such as high blood pressure, heart disease, migraine headaches, insomnia, or back spasms, but infertility has always been considered primarily a physiological issue.  However, in the last two decades, several scientific studies have challenged that supposition, and the majority of those studies support the belief that the mind/body connection is a vital part of the conception process. In just one area of infertility research-the affects of distress on the success rates of In-Vitro (IVF) procedures-there have been fourteen studies.  Ten of those studies found a very clear connection between distress and decreased pregnancy rates, and two more of those studies showed a trend or tendency toward decreased pregnancy rates. How can emotional issues, such as feelings of distress, create infertility?  It is deep within the subconscious mind where all of the emotional issues and blocks related to infertility are stored.  The subconscious mind holds our habits, beliefs, behavioral patterns, anxieties and fears that we have been accumulating since birth.  Then, as adults, when we experience emotions like anxiety, sadness, fear or anger, we...
How to be a good friend.

How to be a good friend.

Here is a great blog from someone that was on a fertility journey, and wanted to share advice for family and friends! (http://tertia.typepad.com/so_close/2004/05/how_to_be_good_.html) “I have quite a few ‘normal’ friends (i.e. not infertile) who read this blog. (I am so far out the closet it is frightening, even my brother and ex flirts read this blog). Imagine how confusing most of the lingo must be for them. Anyhow. Back to the point of this post. One of those friends said to me “I wish you would write about how to be a good friend to an infertile person”. Which is really sweet of her and shows she has already passed one of the requirements. So I started thinking about writing a post on this and realized what a hard task this is. How do you become a Good Friend to an Infertile? Firstly, I have to say that this being a Good Friend to someone struggling to an Infertile is not an easy job at all. It is a job with fluid parameters, a thankless job sometimes and one where it might appear that no matter how hard you try, you never seem to get it right. There are times when you will be extremely busy and the job is very demanding. There are other times where you will benched, forced to sit on the outside looking in. There is not often any logic in this change of demand. Be aware of the volatility of work pressure when applying for this job. It is not a decision to be taken lightly. Secondly, there is not a universal job description,...